Oak use case and thanks to the developers

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Oak use case and thanks to the developers

Peter Harrison-2
Usually this list is justy for people asking questions, so for a change of
pace I would like to show how I've been using Jackrabbit/Oak and the kind
of thing it has enabled me to do.

Escaping the Tyranny of the Domain
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uwZj4XF6zic

Databases encouraged us to tightly couple our applications to fixed and
inflexible data structures. Changes to the data structures could only be
made by developers. With the advent of OO languages the data structure was
even more closely bound up, with Hibernate like persistence systems making
this kind of relationship dangeriously easy.

JackRabbit enabled me to go to break this dependency and develop
applications that could dynamically define their data structures, and where
adding a field was no longer a mission.

The ability to register listeners also enabled me to develop automation
systems that listen for these events to trigger dynemically defined
business rules; rules which are themselves also stored in Jackrabbit.

Introduction to Gravity Workflow Automation
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vUxKeaMjDo0

I originally developed Gravity using Jackrabbit 2.X, but over the last six
months migrated to  Oak. The transition has not been without it's pain,
Gravity is GPL.

I am still usinf OCM, which is a Object to JCR mapper a little like
Hibernate, although I have made several modifications to my version of OCM
to support some use cases I had.

So in summary, thanks to the Jackrabbit/Oak devs! This has fundamentally
changed how I look at data.
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Re: Oak use case and thanks to the developers

Clay Ferguson
Peter, and fellow Jackrabbits.

Thanks for the post and looks like cool work. I just watched Season 4. EP1
of "Silicon Valley" show tonight, and they had stolen one of my grand ideas
I had for the JCR: "A New Internet".  The JCR, and specifically Jackrabbit
as the one and only decent implementation has so much potential. Yet
somehow, I would say 99% of developers have never heard of it. Such a
shame. Not sure if it's a marketing failure or what, but the JCR still
remains the tech world's best kept secret.

Glad to see you breaking new ground, as am I hopefully, with SubNode (
sbnode.com, formerly meta64.com). I think once some killer app gets world
renowned built on the JCR (SubNode if I'm lucky) it will eventually create
some awareness in the industry, but currently I think Adobe is all alone.
What I would love to see is the JCR having some killer app that becomes
like Linux, and has not only a back end (Kernel, JCR), but also some front
end that makes it famous that would be like Ubuntu. So basically my goal is
for SubNode to become to JCR what Ubuntu is to Linux. The "name" that made
the technology go viral. Unfortunately I have a "day job" (I gotta eat) and
haven't been trying to get funding for SubNode, but it is VERY deserving of
that, and someone will eventually just steal all my code and go do it on
their own if I don't.

So my main point to all readers of this mailing list is: How can we make
the JCR become more popular?? NoSQL is popular, but the obvious layer to
put directly on top of a NoSQL is JCR, and I think most of the world's
developers remain sadly oblivious to that fact.


Best regards,
Clay Ferguson
[hidden email]


On Mon, May 1, 2017 at 4:38 AM, Peter Harrison <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Usually this list is justy for people asking questions, so for a change of
> pace I would like to show how I've been using Jackrabbit/Oak and the kind
> of thing it has enabled me to do.
>
> Escaping the Tyranny of the Domain
> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uwZj4XF6zic
>
> Databases encouraged us to tightly couple our applications to fixed and
> inflexible data structures. Changes to the data structures could only be
> made by developers. With the advent of OO languages the data structure was
> even more closely bound up, with Hibernate like persistence systems making
> this kind of relationship dangeriously easy.
>
> JackRabbit enabled me to go to break this dependency and develop
> applications that could dynamically define their data structures, and where
> adding a field was no longer a mission.
>
> The ability to register listeners also enabled me to develop automation
> systems that listen for these events to trigger dynemically defined
> business rules; rules which are themselves also stored in Jackrabbit.
>
> Introduction to Gravity Workflow Automation
> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vUxKeaMjDo0
>
> I originally developed Gravity using Jackrabbit 2.X, but over the last six
> months migrated to  Oak. The transition has not been without it's pain,
> Gravity is GPL.
>
> I am still usinf OCM, which is a Object to JCR mapper a little like
> Hibernate, although I have made several modifications to my version of OCM
> to support some use cases I had.
>
> So in summary, thanks to the Jackrabbit/Oak devs! This has fundamentally
> changed how I look at data.
>
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